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    Data collected from five preselected study areas at P.F.R.A. (Prairie Farmland Rehabitilation Administration) pasture in the mid boreal transition forest at Thickwood Hills Saskatchewan. Species observed are: Mallard (MALL), Gadwall (GADW), American Wigeon (AMWI), American Greenwinged Teal(AGWT), Bluewinged Teal(BWTL), Northern Shoveler(NSHO), Northern Pintail (NOPI), American Pipit (AMPI), Redhead (REDH), Lesser Scaup (LESC), Ring-necked Duck (RNDU), Ruddy Duck (RUDU), Bufflehead (BUFF), Canada Goose (CAGO), Pied-billed Grebe (PBGR), Common Loon (COLO), Horned Grebe (HOGR), American Coot (AMCO), and Eared Grebe (EAGR). Theme: waterfowl census |Quality: qc'ed |Methodology: census of waterfowl in central Saskatchewan, compare burnt and unmanged areas |Format: MS Excel and ASCII |Gaps: 1983, 84, 85, 86, 87 | General: data set contains waterfowl census from five study area (A1, A2, A3, A4, and A5) indicated breeding pair census, wetland survey for 1981, 82, 88, 89, 90, and 92. The main data files are 81census 82census 88census 89census 90census 91census 92census.

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    Data consist of morphometric, anatomical and heavy metal information on Common and King Eiders collected during the breeding season in the Belcher Islands (56°15_N, 79°15_W), East Bay Migratory Bird Sanctuary on Southampton Island (64°04_N, 82°00_W), in Nunavut and near the village of Holman (70°39_N, 117°43_W) on Victoria Island, Northwest Territories. The study was conducted at the three locations in 1997, except at East Bay Migratory Bird Sanctuary where Common Eiders were studied during the breeding season from 1997-2000.

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    Air emissions from oil sands development can come from a number of sources including industrial smokestacks, tailings ponds, transportation, and dust from mining operations. Air quality monitoring under the Joint Canada-Alberta Implementation Plan for the Oil Sands is designed to determine the contribution of emissions from oil sands activities to local and regional air quality and atmospheric deposition both now and in the future. Deposition data include: - Passive Sampling of PACs deployed for two month periods across a network of 17 sites - Active sampling of PACs at three sites to inform the amount of dry deposition - Particulate metals (24 hour integrated samples following the one in six day National Air Pollution Surveillance (NAPS) cycle)

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    Prairie plant species at risk survey planning for Prairie and Northern Region: Data pertaining to the design and implementation of occupancy survey plans for vascular plants listed under the Federal Species at Risk Act in the Prairie and Northern Region (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba). Species include: Buffalo Grass (Buchloe dactyloides), Smooth Goosefoot (Chenopodium subglabrum), Tiny Cryptantha (cryptantha minima), Hairy Prairie Clover (Dalea villosa), Slender Mouse-ear-cress (Halimolobos virgate), Western Spiderwort (Tradescantia occidentalis), Small-flowered Sand Verbena (Tripterocalyx micranthus), Dwarf Woolly-heads (Psilocarphus brevissimus), Hare Footed Locoweed (Oxytropis lagopus).

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    Dataset contains Rare Plant Species and Invasive Plant Species from The Prairie National Wildlife Area (NWA) 27 different unit and zone, Weeb NWA, and Last Mountain Lake (LML) NWA. Also; there are samples from Bradwell (pre 1980), LML (pre 1980), Prairies, Raven Island (2004), St. Denis, Stalwart, Tway (pre 1985), and Webb. The study is about rare vascular plant species at risk in NWA and in Southwestern Saskatchewan. Theme: Habitat assessment |Quality: QC warranted |Methodology: Data were pulled from old reports to indicate the presence of certain plant Species at Risk as far back as 1969 for Prairie, Last Mountain Lake, and Webb National Wildlife Areas. Data from Prairie NWA are from; 1) Desmet, K.D. 1985. 2) Five-Year Management Plan for the Prairie National Wildlife Area, Saskatchewan, CWS Report, Saskatoon, SasKatchewan. 3) Data for LML is from Caldwell, J.R., P.S. Taylor, and E.A. Driver. 1987. 4) Plants of the Last Mountain Lake National Wildlife Area, Blue Jay 45: 234-245. 5) Data for Webb are from the Prairie Wildlife Interpretive Centre (text by Fran Westman). 6) 1978 a Piece of the Prairie, Swift Current, SasKatchewan. Incidental observations were also noted. |Format: MS Excel |Gaps: none |General: Data contains rare plant survey in the National Wildlife Areas in Saskatchewan. General plant surveys until 2003, detailed plant surveys and incidental observation of fauna were also recorded from 2003-2006.

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    Data contains banding information about snow and blue goose gosling recaptured at La Perouse Bay in Manitoba. Dataset contains morphometric, nest, and banding (leg band and web tag) information related to gosling recapture.

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    The Whooping Crane Migration Monitoring dataset contains records of migratory cranes in Canada since 1910 especially in Saskatchewan where cranes spend a substantial part of the annual cycle during spring and fall migration. The dataset includes information on the abundance, location and structure of groups of cranes observed by Environment Canada biologists and by the general public. It also includes information on habitat used during migration. The dataset is used to identify critical habitat under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) and to inform environmental assessment impact processes.

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    This dataset contains candidate draft, candidate proposed, and final critical habitat for vascular plants listed under the Federal Species at Risk Act in the Prairie and Northern Region (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba) as identified in a supporting Recovery Strategy or Action Plan. The purpose is to identify the discrete boundaries of areas containing critical habitat (at the draft, proposed, and final stages of the recovery planning process) for vascular plants in the Prairie and Northern Region. Species include: Tiny Cryptantha (cryptantha minima), Small-flowered Sand Verbena (Tripterocalyx micranthus), Slender Mouse-ear-cress (Halimolobos virgate), Western Spiderwort (Tradescantia occidentalis), Porsild's Bryum (Haplodontium macrocarpum), Rough Agalinis (Agalinis aspera), Small White Lady's-slipper (Cypripedium candidum), Smooth Goosefoot (Chenopodium subglabrum), Western Silvery Aster (Symphyotrichum sericeum), Soapweed (Yucca glauca), Whitebark Pine (Pinus albicaulis), and Gattinger's Agalinis (Agalinis gattingeri).

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    With the changing climate conditions, marine traffic along Canada’s coastal regions has increased over the past couple of decades and the need to improve our state of preparedness for oil-spill-related emergencies is critical. Baseline coastal information, such as shoreline form, substrate, and vegetation type, is required for prioritizing operations, coordinating onsite spill response activities (i.e. Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique [SCAT]), and providing information for wildlife and ecosystem management. Between 2010 and 2017, georeferenced high-definition videography and photos were collected for various study sites across coastal Canada. The study areas include Beaufort Sea, Mackenzie Delta channels and Banks Island in the western Canadian Arctic; James Bay, Hudson Bay, Nunavik, Resolute Bay, Victoria Strait, Baffin Island and Coronation Gulf in the eastern Canadian Arctic; Labrador, Bay of Fundy and Chedabucto Bay in Atlantic Canada and Kitimat, Haida Gwaii and Burrard Inlet in the northern Pacific. Data was collected during ice-free and low tide conditions (where applicable) between July and September. Low-altitude helicopter surveys were conducted at each study site to capture video of the shoreline characteristics. In addition to acquiring videography, ground-based observations were recorded in several locations for validation. Shoreline segmentation was then carried out by manual interpretation of the oblique videography and the photos aided by ancillary data. This involved splitting and classifying the shoreline vectors based on homogeneity of the upper intertidal zone. Detailed geomorphological information (i.e. shoreline type, substrate, slope, height, accessibility etc.) describing the upper intertidal, lower intertidal, supratidal and backshore zones was extracted from the video and entered into a geospatial database using a customized data collection form. In addition, biological characteristics like biobands, water features, fauna, human use etc. observed along the coast were recorded. The data was also validated through ground samples (when available) and a second interpreter QA (quality analysis) was performed on each dataset (excluding Nunavik) to ensure high quality and consistency. The final dataset contains segments ranging in length from 150 metres to 2500 metres. In total, from 2010 to 2017, within the 14 study sites, about 26,150 km of shoreline were mapped.

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    Autumn aerial and ground surveys of Greater White-fronted Geese in southern Saskatchewan and Alberta, 1992-2012 (ongoing, annual survey). Ground surveys are restricted to one location on the South Saskatchewan River north of Cabri, Saskatchewan. Aerial surveys include most traditional fall staging area wetlands in southern Saskatchewan and Alberta, as well as the Peace River area of northwest Alberta. Counts are observer estimates of flocks of this species. Data available in electronic format.