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2023

72 record(s)
 
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    The Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) program provides data and information to track Canada's performance on key environmental sustainability issues. The Global Trends in Conserved Areas indicator reports the amount and percentage of global terrestrial and marine area conserved for the preservation of nature. The indicator also shows a comparison of area protected among 10 selected countries. Global information on protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures is collected, analyzed and made available by the World Database on Protected Areas and the World Database on Other Effective Area-based Conservation Measures. Land and/or water access and use within protected areas are controlled primarily for the purpose of conserving nature (for example, a park, a conservation area or a wildlife reserve). Other effective area-based conservation measures (OECMs) are also managed in ways that achieve positive and sustained long-term outcomes for the conservation of biodiversity, regardless of their stated objectives. Conserved areas (protected areas and OECMs) are key management tools used for the preservation of biodiversity. Well-managed conserved areas are one way to protect wild species and their habitats for present and future generations. Habitat conservation is a measure of human response to the loss of biodiversity and natural habitat. Information is provided to Canadians in a number of formats including: static and interactive maps, charts and graphs, HTML and CSV data tables and downloadable reports. See the supplementary documentation for the data sources and details on how the data were collected and how the indicator was calculated. Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators: https://www.canada.ca/environmental-indicators

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    As part of a study to characterize the habitat of Canada’s only known population of Hine’s emerald dragonfly (HED), a species listed as endangered since 2011, groundwater was collected and analyzed from the eastern Minesing Wetlands near Barrie, Ontario. The water quality analyses included general chemistry parameters (major anions and cations, nutrients) as well as water and nitrate isotope ratios. Groundwater samples were collected in the fall of 2010, 2013, 2014 and in the spring and fall of 2015 to 2017 from a network of groundwater wells and piezometers in the wetland and adjacent uplands. Samples from groundwater seeps discharging along the eastern margin of the wetland were collected in May of 2016 and 2017. Information on the methods used and results from this long-term study can be found in Wetlands Ecology and Management. 31: 309-327. DOI 10.1007/s11273-023-09918-3. Ref: Spoelstra, J., R. Post. (2023) Groundwater characterization of the eastern Minesing Wetlands in support of the endangered Hine’s emerald dragonfly (Somatochlora hineana). Wetlands Ecology and Management 31: 309-327. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11273-023-09918-3.

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    The National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) is Canada's public inventory of pollutant releases (to air, water and land), disposals and transfers for recycling. The files below contain a map of Canada showing the locations of all facilities that reported disposals and transfers to the NPRI in the most recent reporting year, by reported total quantities. The map is available in both ESRI REST (to use with ARC GIS) and WMS (open source) formats. For more information about the individual reporting facilities, a dataset is available in an csv format. Please consult the following resources to enhance your analysis: - Guide on using and Interpreting NPRI Data: https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/national-pollutant-release-inventory/using-interpreting-data.html - Access additional data from the NPRI, including datasets and mapping products: https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/national-pollutant-release-inventory/tools-resources-data/exploredata.html

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    "The Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) program provides data and information to track Canada's performance on key environmental sustainability issues. The Ecological integrity of national parks indicator summarizes the condition (good, fair, poor) and trend (improving, stable, declining) of ecosystems within 42 national parks. National parks help to protect biodiversity, preserve ecosystem services, connect landscapes, and provide a natural solution for climate change by capturing and storing carbon. National parks also help to build knowledge and understanding of ecosystems and connect Canadians with nature. Information is provided to Canadians in a number of formats including: static and interactive maps, charts and graphs, HTML and CSV data tables and downloadable reports. See the supplementary documentation for the data sources and details on how the data were collected and how the indicator was calculated. Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators: https://www.canada.ca/environmental-indicators

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    This study aimed to develop and improve upon analytical methods and sampling techniques for detecting oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) seepage from mining containments and discriminating any seepage from the natural bitumen background in groundwaters influenced by the Alberta McMurray formation. Two groups of monoaromatic acids were analyzed that showed significant enrichment in OSPW, while O2/O4 ratios and acid extractable organics (AEOs) did not. A secondary objective was to assess anthropogenically derived artificial sweeteners and per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) as potential tracers for OSPW. All data are a part subject of a publication containing method details, full QA/QC, interpretations and conclusions: Hewitt, L. M., Roy, J. W., Rowland, S. J., Bickerton, G., DeSilva, A., Headley, J. V., Milestone, C. B., Scarlett, A. G., Brown, S., Spencer, C., West, C. E., Peru, K. M., Grapentine, L., Ahad, J. M. E., Pakdel, H., & Frank, R. A. (2020). Advances in Distinguishing Groundwater Influenced by Oil Sands Process-Affected Water (OSPW) from Natural Bitumen-Influenced Groundwaters. Environmental science & technology, 54(3), 1522–1532. doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.9b05040

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    This study investigated the fate of rare earth elements (lanthanides) in in wastewater after being treated by various processes conducted at six different wastewater treatment plants throughout Canada. This research also focused specifically on the fate of medical gadolinium (Gd) which is used primarily in medical imaging activities. Samples were collected from each site over a three-day sampling regime in the summer of 2018. Surface water was collected for comparison from the Athabasca River in Alberta, Canada and from the St. Lawrence River in Quebec, Canada. All data are a part subject of a publication containing method details, full QA/QC, interpretation and conclusions. Citation: Turcotte, P.; Smyth, S.A.; Gagné, F.; Gagnon, C. Lanthanides Release and Partitioning in Municipal Wastewater Effluents. Toxics 2022, 10, 254. doi.org/10.3390/toxics10050254

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    The National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) is Canada's public inventory of pollutant releases (to air, water and land), disposals and transfers for recycling. The files below contain a map of Canada showing the locations of all facilities that reported direct releases of Criteria Air Contaminants to the NPRI. The data are for the most recent reporting year, by reported total quantities of these releases. The map is available in both ESRI REST (to use with ARC GIS) and WMS (open source) formats. For more information about the individual reporting facilities, a dataset is available in a CSV format. Please consult the following resources to enhance your analysis: - Guide on using and Interpreting NPRI Data: https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/national-pollutant-release-inventory/using-interpreting-data.html - Access additional data from the NPRI, including datasets and mapping products: https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/national-pollutant-release-inventory/tools-resources-data/exploredata.html

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    The National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) is Canada's public inventory of pollutant releases (to air, water and land), disposals and transfers for recycling. Each file contains annual total releases for the past five years by media (air, water or land), broken-down by province, industry or substance. Files are in .CSV format. The results can be further broken down using the pre-defined search available at the bottom of the NPRI Data Search webpage. The results returned by the NPRI search engine may differ from the numbers contained in the downloadable files. The online search engine’s results will display releases, disposals and transfers reported by facilities, but does not distinguish between media type (i.e. air, water, land). It also displays facilities reporting only under Ontario Regulation 127/01 and facilities submitting “did not meet criteria” reports. Please consult the following resources to enhance your analysis: - Guide on using and Interpreting NPRI Data: https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/national-pollutant-release-inventory/using-interpreting-data.html - Access additional data from the NPRI, including datasets and mapping products: https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/national-pollutant-release-inventory/tools-resources-data/exploredata.html

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    Stream sampling was conducted in the Whitemans Creek watershed in February 2012 to assess water quality during winter baseflow conditions. A total of 30 stream sites were sampled where streams in the watershed intersected roadways. In addition to conventional water quality parameters (e.g., major anions, major cations, ammonium, soluble reactive phosphorus, alkalinity, dissolved organic carbon), stable isotopes of nitrate and sulfate were analyzed to provide insights into the sources of these compounds in the streams. Select artificial sweeteners (acesulfame, cyclamate, saccharin, sucralose) and anionic herbicides (glyphosate, AMPA, 2,4-D, glufosinate, fosamine, MCPA, picloram) were also measured as novel tracers of certain anthropogenic activities that potentially impact water quality. These data, as well as information on the sampling and analytical methods used, and interpretation of the data, are presented in the report, Water quality snapshot of Whitemans Creek during winter baseflow conditions (https://open-science.canada.ca/items/a9626ada-8a8c-4647-9e02-7efc19c9779a).

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    Numerous actions have been undertaken by farmers to attenuate the impact of agricultural activities on aquatic ecosystems. The identification of biomarkers that respond quickly to water quality improvement could facilitate the assessment of adopted alternative practices and help maintain mobilization among stakeholders. Here, we evaluated the potential of the Comet assay, a biomarker of genotoxic effects, using a freshwater mussel, Elliptio complanata, as a model animal. The frequency of DNA damage was assessed in hemocytes of mussels collected from a pristine habitat (MSH) and caged for 8 weeks in the Pot au Beurre River (PAB), a tributary of Lake St-Pierre (QC, Canada) impacted by agricultural activities. Pesticides and water quality parameters were also measured in surface water on a weekly basis during the caging period. Our findings suggest that the Comet assay is a sensitive tool for the early detection of changes in water toxicity following the adoption of agricultural beneficial practices. All data are a part subject of a publication containing method details, full QA/QC, interpretation and conclusions. Citation: Gendron, A.D., Lacaze, É., Taranu, Z.E., Gouge, R., Larbi-Youcef, Y., Houde, M., André, C., Gagné, F., Triffault-Bouchet, G. and Giroux, I. (2023), The Comet Assay, a Sensitive Biomarker of Water Quality Improvement Following Adoption of Beneficial Agricultural Practices?. Environ Toxicol Chem. doi.org/10.1002/etc.5711