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    An Area of Concern (AOC) is a location where environmental quality is degraded compared to other areas in the Great Lake Basin resulting in the impairment of beneficial uses. A total of 43 AOCs were identified as a result of Annex 2 of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA).The Canada-United States GLWQA identifies 14 beneficial uses that must be restored in order to remove the designation as an Area of Concern. A beneficial use is defined as the ability of living organisms (including humans) to use the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem without adverse consequences. A Beneficial Use Impairment (BUI) is a condition that interferes with the enjoyment of a water use. Each BUI has a set of locally-defined delisting criteria that are specific, measurable, achievable, and scientifically-defensible. The Remedial Action Plan (RAP) is administered locally in accordance with the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA) and the Canada-Ontario Agreement (COA). The RAP is an ongoing collaborative effort implemented by federal, provincial, and local governments as well as industry and public partners. There are 3 key stages of the RAP: Stage 1 is a detailed description of the environmental problem; Stage 2 identifies remedial actions and options; Stage 3 is the final document providing evidence that the beneficial uses have been restored and the AOC can be “delisted”. The Toronto and Region Area of Concern extends along the northern shoreline of Lake Ontario from the Rouge River in the east to Etobicoke Creek in the west. The 2000 km2 (200 000 ha) area includes the Toronto waterfront and 6 watersheds: Etobicoke Creek, Mimico Creek, Humber River, Don River, Highland Creek and Rouge River. The drainage basin of these watersheds makes the Area of Concern a study in contrasts: more than 40% of the area is still rural and contains one of the world’s largest natural parks in an urban/agricultural setting; at the same time, more than three million people live in the Area of Concern and the City of Toronto is in the centre of the most densely urbanized area in Canada. The Toronto region was designated as an AOC in 1986 because a review of available data indicated that water quality and environmental health were severely degraded. Several centuries of agriculture and urban development have dramatically reshaped the natural environment of the Toronto and Region AOC. Contaminants from stormwater runoff and melting snow from the area’s six watersheds create serious impacts in Lake Ontario. Overflows of stormwater mixed with raw sewage are a serious problem following heavy rains in the lower portions of the Don and Humber Rivers and along the waterfront. Spills, road runoff and chemical input to sewers from industries and residences also contribute to poor water quality. In the Toronto and Region AOC’s Remedial Action Plan (RAP) report, Clean Waters, Clear Choices: Recommendations for Action (1994) eight beneficial uses were identified as impaired and three were identified as requiring further assessment. For more information visit: https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/great-lakes-protection/areas-concern/toronto-region.html

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    The St. Clair was designated as one of the 43 Areas of Concern in accordance with Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA). Remedial Action Plan (RAP) is an ongoing collaborative effort implemented by federal, provincial, and local governments as well as industry and public partners. There are 3 key stages of the RAP: Stage 1 is a detailed description of the environmental problem; Stage 2 identifies remedial actions and options; Stage 3 is the final document providing evidence that the beneficial uses have been restored and the AOC can be “delisted”. The St. Clair River, a key shipping channel in the Great Lakes Seaway system, flows 64 km from Lake Huron to Lake St. Clair. The Area of Concern covers 3350 km2 (335 000 ha). For more information visit https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/great-lakes-protection/areas-concern/st-clair-river.html

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    This dataset contains the growth and survival data for Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) exposed to sediment from eleven sites within the St. Marys Area of Concern, as well as reference sediment (a mixture of sediment from two reference sites within Lake Erie, Long Point Marsh and Long Point Bay). The embryo-larval Fathead minnow exposure occurred over a three week period. Exposure was done from the egg stage (which lasted 5 days) to 9 and 16 days post hatch.

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    The St. Marys River was designated as one of the 43 Areas of Concern in accordance with Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA). Remedial Action Plan (RAP) is an ongoing collaborative effort implemented by federal, provincial, and local governments as well as industry and public partners. There are 3 key stages of the RAP: Stage 1 is a detailed description of the environmental problem; Stage 2 identifies remedial actions and options; Stage 3 is the final document providing evidence that the beneficial uses have been restored and the AOC can be “delisted”. The St. Marys River is a 112-km international channel that flows from Lake Superior into the North Channel of Lake Huron. The Area of Concern extends approximately two thirds of the river, from its head at Whitefish Bay downstream to St. Joseph Island. For more information visit https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/great-lakes-protection/areas-concern/st-marys-river.html

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    Wheatley Harbour was designated as one of the 43 Areas of Concern in accordance with Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA). Remedial Action Plan (RAP) is an ongoing collaborative effort implemented by federal, provincial, and local governments as well as industry and public partners. There are 3 key stages of the RAP: Stage 1 is a detailed description of the environmental problem; Stage 2 identifies remedial actions and options; Stage 3 is the final document providing evidence that the beneficial uses have been restored and the AOC can be “delisted”. Wheatley Harbour was the third Canadian Area of Concern (AOC) to be delisted In 2010. Wheatley Harbour is a small harbour on the north shore of Lake Erie, just east of Point Pelee, Ontario. The Area of Concern, the only one on the Canadian shore of Lake Erie, encompasses the harbour and the Muddy Creek wetland, a provincially significant wetland about 13 ha in size. For more information visit: https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/great-lakes-protection/areas-concern/wheatley-harbour.html

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    The Niagara River was designated as one of the 43 Areas of Concern in accordance with Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA). Remedial Action Plan (RAP) is an ongoing collaborative effort implemented by federal, provincial, and local governments as well as industry and public partners. There are 3 key stages of the RAP: Stage 1 is a detailed description of the environmental problem; Stage 2 identifies remedial actions and options; Stage 3 is the final document providing evidence that the beneficial uses have been restored and the AOC can be “delisted”. The Niagara River is a 58-km waterway connecting Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. The Canadian section of the Niagara River Area of Concern extends along the entire length of the Canadian side of the Niagara River, and includes the Canadian side of Niagara Falls and the Welland River watershed. For more information visit https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/great-lakes-protection/areas-concern/niagara-river.html

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    This dataset contains the concentrations of halogenated phenolic compounds in plasma for the fish species Brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus), from 3 site locations (Frenchman's Bay, Tommy Thompson, and Toronto Island) within the Toronto and Region Area of Concern. Halogenated Phenolic Compounds have emerged as an important class of environmental contaminants in aquatic vertebrates, wildlife, and humans. They represent 4 of the 7 classes of substances listed as chemicals of mutual concern in the Great Lakes.

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    This dataset contains the growth and survival data for Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) exposed to sediment from twelve sites within the Hamilton Harbour Area of Concern, as well as reference sediment (a mixture of sediment from two reference sites within Lake Erie, Long Point Marsh and Long Point Bay). The embryo-larval Fathead minnow exposure occurred over a three week period. Exposure was done from the egg stage (which lasted 5 days) to 9 and 16 days post hatch.

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    The Regional Deterministic Prediction System (RDPS) carries out physics calculations to arrive at deterministic predictions of atmospheric elements from the current day out to 84 hours into the future. Atmospheric elements include temperature, precipitation, cloud cover, wind speed and direction, humidity and others. This product contains raw numerical results of these calculations. Geographical coverage includes Canada and the United States. Data is available at horizontal resolution of about 10 km up to 33 vertical levels. Predictions are performed four times a day.

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    Thunder Bay was designated as one of the 43 Areas of Concern in accordance with Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA). Remedial Action Plan (RAP) is an ongoing collaborative effort implemented by federal, provincial, and local governments as well as industry and public partners. There are 3 key stages of the RAP: Stage 1 is a detailed description of the environmental problem; Stage 2 identifies remedial actions and options; Stage 3 is the final document providing evidence that the beneficial uses have been restored and the AOC can be “delisted”. The Thunder Bay Area of Concern extends approximately 28 km along the shoreline of Lake Superior from north of Bare Point south to Flatland Island and up to 9 km offshore, including the Welcome Islands. The area’s watershed is drained by the Kaministiquia River system and a number of smaller rivers and creeks. The marsh area of the harbour represents a major portion of wetlands in the Lake Superior basin in Canada, providing habitat for nesting and migrating species of birds and a wide variety of fish. For more information visit: https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/great-lakes-protection/areas-concern/thunder-bay.html