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Water - Drainage regions - Great Lakes

52 record(s)
 
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    Water quality and ecosystem health data collected using a risk-based monitoring approach to support the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement are included in this dataset. By conducting regular, systematic measurements of the physical, chemical and biological conditions of the Great Lakes Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) is able to: measure the natural changes and conditions of water quality; determine changes over time, at various locations, of water contaminants and/or threats; support development of science-based guidelines for water, fish, and sediment; identify emerging issues and threats; track the results of remedial measures and regulatory decisions; report and assess science results through performance indicators and in an Open Science environment to support an ecosystem approach to environmental and resource management in the Great Lakes. Data are collected by Environment and Climate Change Canada to meet federal commitments related to the Great Lakes as transboundary waters crossing, inter- provincial and international borders under the authorities of the Department of the Environment Act, the Canada Water Act, the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 and the Boundary Waters Treaty including the commitments under the Canada-United States Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.

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    Hamilton Harbour is a 2200 ha embayment located at the west end of Lake Ontario It was designated as one of 43 Areas of Concern in 1987 under the GLWQA where 11 beneficial uses of the harbour were deemed impaired. One of the primary recommendations of the Hamilton Harbour Remedial Action Plan was to decrease nutrient loads to Hamilton Harbour and establish water quality targets to decrease undesirable algae, improve water clarity and restore dissolved oxygen levels. This long term data set consists of vertical profiles of various physical parameters collected in Hamilton Harbour since 1987 to measure ecological response of remedial efforts.

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    The Great Lakes Basin Integrated Nutrient Dataset compiles and standardizes phosphorus, nitrogen, and suspended solids data collected between the 2000-2019 water years from multiple Canadian and American sources around the Great Lakes. Ultimately, the goal is to enable regional nutrient data analysis within the Great Lakes Basin. This data is not directly used in the Water Quality Monitoring and Surveillance Division tributary load calculations. Data processing steps include standardizing data column and nutrient names, date-time conversion to Universal Time Coordinates, normalizing concentration units to milligram per liter, and reporting all phosphorus and nitrogen compounds 'as phosphorus' or 'as nitrogen'. Data sources include the Environment and Climate Change Canada National Long-term Water Quality Monitoring Data (WQMS), the Provincial (Stream) Water Quality Monitoring Network (PWQMN) of the Ontario Ministry of the Environment, the Grand River Conservation Authority (GRCA) water quality data, and Heidelberg University’s National Center for Water Quality Research (NCWQR) Tributary Loading Program.

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    Hamilton Harbour is located at the west end of Lake Ontario. It was designated as one of 43 Areas of Concern in 1987 under the GLWQA where 11 beneficial uses of the harbour were deemed impaired. One of the primary recommendations of the Hamilton Harbour Remedial Action Plan was to decrease nutrient loads to Hamilton Harbour and establish water quality targets to decrease undesirable algae and improve water clarity. This long term data set consists of spatial and temporal water quality data collected in Hamilton Harbour since 1987 to measure ecological response of remedial efforts.

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    This project is aimed at developing biochemical and molecular approaches that can be used to determine the effects of priority environmental chemicals, and environmental mixtures on free-living avian species. In vitro, ex vivo, and in ovo screening methods are used to address such questions with wild avian species. The fundamental goal of the study is to expand our understanding of toxic chemical effects on wildlife and to generate data to support the protection of the environment and conservation of biodiversity and habitat.

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    The coast of South-Eastern Georgian Bay has numerous bays and inlets. This area is an important resource for drinking water, recreation and fish habitat. While offshore water quality of Georgian Bay is not impaired, nearshore embayments and inlets, in some instances, have been reported to experience water quality degradation. Concerns include excess nutrients, increased frequency of cyanobacteria blooms and hypoxia. The Lake Simcoe Clean-up Fund was expanded in 2012 to include the South East shore of Georgian Bay. This mandate allowed for researchers to assess water quality and nuisance and toxic algal blooms within a geographical scope from the Nottawassaga Valley Watershed to the coast of Georgian Bay between Port Severn and the French River. The program was completed in 2017. Lake Simcoe is the fourth largest lake entirely in Ontario. It is part of the Trent Severn Waterway connecting Georgian Bay to Lake Ontario where tourism generates more than $200 million per year. In 2007-2012 the Lake Simcoe Cleanup Fund was created to address the increased phosphorus loading from point and non-point sources, research and monitoring to improve environmental information for decision making and conservation of fish and aquatic wildlife habitat. Collaborative research between a number of government and non-government stakeholders have contributed to monitoring, research and management of Lake Simcoe to ensure long term ecosystem health of this valuable resource.

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    This dataset is part of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Shoreline Classification and Pre-Spill database. Shoreline classification data has been developed for use by the Environmental Emergencies Program of Environment and Climate Change Canada for environmental protection purposes. Marine and freshwater shorelines are classified according to the character (substrate and form) of the upper intertidal (foreshore) or upper swash zone (Sergy, 2008). This is the area where oil from a spill usually becomes stranded and where treatment or cleanup activities take place. The basic parameter that defines the shoreline type is the material that is present in the intertidal zone. The presence or absence of sediments is a key factor in determining whether oil is stranded on the surface of a substrate or can penetrate and/or be buried. This dataset contains thousands of linear shoreline segments ranging in length from 200 m and 2 km long. The entities represent the location of the segments and their geomorphological description. There exist further fields in the attribute table for this dataset. We are currently working on standardizing our shoreline segmentation datasets and the updated data will soon be uploaded to the catalog. Sergy, G. (2008). The Shoreline Classification Scheme for SCAT and Oil Spill Response in Canada. Proceedings of the 31stArctic and Marine Oil Spill Program Technical Seminar.Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON, Pp. 811-819.

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    This project involves the development of biochemical and molecular approaches that can be used to determine the effects of priority environmental chemicals, legacy chemicals, environmental mixtures, and other environmental stressors on avian species. In vitro screening methods and non-invasive techniques to measure overall stress are used to address such questions with domestic and wild avian species. The fundamental goal of the study is to expand our understanding of toxic chemical effects and other ecological stressors on wildlife and to generate data to support the protection of the environment and conservation of biodiversity and habitat.

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    The Niagara River was designated as one of the 43 Areas of Concern in accordance with Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA). Remedial Action Plan (RAP) is an ongoing collaborative effort implemented by federal, provincial, and local governments as well as industry and public partners. There are 3 key stages of the RAP: Stage 1 is a detailed description of the environmental problem; Stage 2 identifies remedial actions and options; Stage 3 is the final document providing evidence that the beneficial uses have been restored and the AOC can be “delisted”. The Niagara River is a 58-km waterway connecting Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. The Canadian section of the Niagara River Area of Concern extends along the entire length of the Canadian side of the Niagara River, and includes the Canadian side of Niagara Falls and the Welland River watershed. For more information visit https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/great-lakes-protection/areas-concern/niagara-river.html

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    An Area of Concern (AOC) is a location where environmental quality is degraded compared to other areas in the Great Lake Basin resulting in the impairment of beneficial uses. A total of 43 AOCs were identified as a result of Annex 2 of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA).The Canada-United States GLWQA identifies 14 beneficial uses that must be restored in order to remove the designation as an Area of Concern. A beneficial use is defined as the ability of living organisms (including humans) to use the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem without adverse consequences. A Beneficial Use Impairment (BUI) is a condition that interferes with the enjoyment of a water use. Each BUI has a set of locally-defined delisting criteria that are specific, measurable, achievable, and scientifically-defensible. The Remedial Action Plan (RAP) is administered locally in accordance with the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA) and the Canada-Ontario Agreement (COA). The RAP is an ongoing collaborative effort implemented by federal, provincial, and local governments as well as industry and public partners. There are 3 key stages of the RAP: Stage 1 is a detailed description of the environmental problem; Stage 2 identifies remedial actions and options; Stage 3 is the final document providing evidence that the beneficial uses have been restored and the AOC can be “delisted”. The Detroit River, a 51 km-long connecting channel, is one of five binational AOCs. The Detroit River has a long history as a shipping channel and it has contributed greatly to the industrialization and development of Ontario and the north-eastern United States. As a result, however, it has been severely degraded due to frequent dredging, contamination directly into the water or indirectly by atmospheric deposition (i.e. mercury) and through the disposal of human and chemical wastes. For more information, visit detroitriver.ca and/or view a 2010 BUI status update at: https://www.ijc.org/en/detroit-river-status-beneficial-use-impairments