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    Herring gulls are piscivorous and occupy a high trophic level, thus they can accumulate contaminant concentrations attoxic effect levels. Data provided here is part of a larger Great Lakes-wide study that has taken place over four decades. Nest counts and contaminants data for Fighting Island (Detroit River) and Middle Island (Lake Erie) are available. Species include: herring gulls, ring-billed gulls, common tern, black-crowned night-herons. Surveys are on-going, but the gulls have not returned to the Detroit River system since the year 2007.

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    An Area of Concern (AOC) is a location where environmental quality is degraded compared to other areas in the Great Lake Basin resulting in the impairment of beneficial uses. A total of 43 AOCs were identified as a result of Annex 2 of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA).The Canada-United States GLWQA identifies 14 beneficial uses that must be restored in order to remove the designation as an Area of Concern. A beneficial use is defined as the ability of living organisms (including humans) to use the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem without adverse consequences. A Beneficial Use Impairment (BUI) is a condition that interferes with the enjoyment of a water use. Each BUI has a set of locally-defined delisting criteria that are specific, measurable, achievable, and scientifically-defensible. The Remedial Action Plan (RAP) is administered locally in accordance with the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA) and the Canada-Ontario Agreement (COA). The RAP is an ongoing collaborative effort implemented by federal, provincial, and local governments as well as industry and public partners. There are 3 key stages of the RAP: Stage 1 is a detailed description of the environmental problem; Stage 2 identifies remedial actions and options; Stage 3 is the final document providing evidence that the beneficial uses have been restored and the AOC can be “delisted”. The Detroit River, a 51 km-long connecting channel, is one of five binational AOCs. The Detroit River has a long history as a shipping channel and it has contributed greatly to the industrialization and development of Ontario and the north-eastern United States. As a result, however, it has been severely degraded due to frequent dredging, contamination directly into the water or indirectly by atmospheric deposition (i.e. mercury) and through the disposal of human and chemical wastes. For more information, visit detroitriver.ca and/or view a 2010 BUI status update at: https://www.ijc.org/en/detroit-river-status-beneficial-use-impairments

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    An Area of Concern (AOC) is a location where environmental quality is degraded compared to other areas in the Great Lake Basin resulting in the impairment of beneficial uses. A total of 43 AOCs were identified as a result of Annex 2 of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA).The Canada-United States GLWQA identifies 14 beneficial uses that must be restored in order to remove the designation as an Area of Concern. A beneficial use is defined as the ability of living organisms (including humans) to use the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem without adverse consequences. A Beneficial Use Impairment (BUI) is a condition that interferes with the enjoyment of a water use. Each BUI has a set of locally-defined delisting criteria that are specific, measurable, achievable, and scientifically-defensible. The Remedial Action Plan (RAP) is administered locally in accordance with the Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA) and the Canada-Ontario Agreement (COA). The RAP is an ongoing collaborative effort implemented by federal, provincial, and local governments as well as industry and public partners. There are 3 key stages of the RAP: Stage 1 is a detailed description of the environmental problem; Stage 2 identifies remedial actions and options; Stage 3 is the final document providing evidence that the beneficial uses have been restored and the AOC can be “delisted”. The St. Clair River, a key shipping channel in the Great Lakes Seaway system, flows 64 kilometers from Lake Huron to Lake St. Clair. The St. Clair River is one of five binational AOCs under the Canada – United States Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (1987). Approximately 170 000 people live in the AOC, particularly in the urban centers of Sarnia, Ontario and Port Huron, Michigan. The St. Clair River has greatly contributed to Ontario's and Michigan's industrial, commercial, and municipal development, and as a result it has been severely degraded due to the improper wastewater management, frequent dredging, and both point and non-point sources of contamination. For more information, visit: http://www.friendsofstclair.ca/www/rap/index.html

  • Water quality and ecosystem health data used to conduct a cumulative effects assessment of Lake Ontario, Niagara River and St. Lawrence River nearshore waters in support of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement are included in this dataset. Data related to nearshore stressors is integrated into an overall assessment in a three-phased approach: 1) classification of the nearshore into Regional Units using physical processes and lake characteristics; 2) overall assessment of the state (cumulative stress) of each Regional Unit; and 3) integrate additional information related to nearshore areas of high ecological value. Assessment data is presented within a 30 metre depth zone along the coast. For purposes of determining stress on nearshore waters it is necessary to consider the zones of influence and zones of impact. Measures used to assess the nearshore waters of Lake Ontario are broken into four categories: 1) Coastal Processes (Shoreline Hardening, Littoral Barriers, Tributary Connectivity); 2) Contaminants in Water & Sediment (Water Quality, Sediment Quality, Benthic Community); 3) Nuisance & Harmful Algae (Cyanobacteria, Cladophora); and 4) Human Use (Beach Postings, Fish Consumption, Treated Drinking Water).

  • Water quality and ecosystem health data used to conduct a cumulative effects assessment of Lake Huron and St. Marys River nearshore waters in support of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement are included in this dataset. Data related to nearshore stressors is integrated into an overall assessment in a three-phased approach: 1) classification of the nearshore into Regional Units using physical processes and lake characteristics; 2) overall assessment of the state (cumulative stress) of each Regional Unit; and 3) integrate additional information related to nearshore areas of high ecological value. Assessment data is presented within a 30 metre depth zone along the coast. For purposes of determining stress on nearshore waters it is necessary to consider the zones of influence and zones of impact. Measures used to assess the nearshore waters of Lake Huron are broken into four categories: 1) Coastal Processes (Shoreline Hardening, Littoral Barriers, Tributary Connectivity); 2) Contaminants in Water & Sediment (Water Quality, Sediment Quality, Benthic Community); 3) Nuisance & Harmful Algae (Cyanobacteria, Cladophora); and 4) Human Use (Beach Postings, Fish Consumption, Treated Drinking Water).

  • Water quality and ecosystem health data used to conduct a cumulative effects assessment of Lake Erie, St. Clair River, Lake St. Clair and Detroit River nearshore waters in support of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement are included in this dataset. Data related to nearshore stressors is integrated into an overall assessment in a three-phased approach: 1) classification of the nearshore into Regional Units using physical processes and lake characteristics; 2) overall assessment of the state (cumulative stress) of each Regional Unit; and 3) integrate additional information related to nearshore areas of high ecological value. Assessment data is presented within a 15 metre depth zone along the coast. For purposes of determining stress on nearshore waters it is necessary to consider the zones of influence and zones of impact. Measures used to assess the nearshore waters of Lake Erie are broken into four categories: 1) Coastal Processes (Shoreline Hardening, Littoral Barriers, Tributary Connectivity); 2) Contaminants in Water & Sediment (Water Quality, Sediment Quality, Benthic Community); 3) Nuisance & Harmful Algae (Cyanobacteria, Cladophora, Dissolved Oxygen); and 4) Human Use (Beach Postings, Fish Consumption, Treated Drinking Water).

  • Water quality and ecosystem health data used to conduct a cumulative effects assessment of Lake Superior nearshore waters in support of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement are included in this dataset. Data related to nearshore stressors is integrated into an overall assessment in a three-phased approach: 1) classification of the nearshore into Regional Units using physical processes and lake characteristics; 2) overall assessment of the state (cumulative stress) of each Regional Unit; and 3) integrate additional information related to nearshore areas of high ecological value. Assessment data is presented within a 100 metre depth zone along the coast. For purposes of determining stress on nearshore waters it is necessary to consider the zones of influence and zones of impact. Measures used to assess the nearshore waters of Lake Superior are broken into four categories: 1) Coastal Processes (Shoreline Hardening, Littoral Barriers, Tributary Connectivity); 2) Contaminants in Water & Sediment (Water Quality, Sediment Quality, Benthic Community); 3) Nuisance & Harmful Algae (Cyanobacteria, Cladophora); and 4) Human Use (Beach Postings, Fish Consumption, Treated Drinking Water).

  • Water quality and ecosystem health data used to conduct a cumulative effects assessment of Canadian Great Lakes nearshore waters in support of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement are included in this dataset. The data was collected by various government and non-government agencies and organizations and integrated into this dataset to allow the assessment to be conducted. By conducting a regular, systematic assessment of cumulative effects in the nearshore waters of the Great Lakes Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) is able to identify areas of high quality and areas under stress. Knowledge of ecological thresholds, other Great Lakes assessments, stressor information, indicators and local and traditional ecological knowledge will be used to aid in: 1) the identification and mapping of high quality nearshore areas and areas that are or may become subject to high stress and; 2) the determination of factors and cumulative effects that are causing stress or threats. Cumulative effects impacting the nearshore and future threats to areas of high ecological value will be better understood and the knowledge shared will assist in priority setting for science and management at a meaningful and practical spatial scale within each Great Lake and connecting channel.