Keyword

Environmental Stewardship Branch

104 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
Formats
Representation types
Update frequencies
status
From 1 - 10 / 104
  • Categories  

    The national wetland layer contains wetland data compiled from the best available data from each region, classified by wetland type. Wetlands are mapped as polygons in geographic layers, which are integrated into a master geodatabase at the national scale.Information from each contributing dataset was classified based on the Canadian Wetland Classification System, which contains five main wetland classes (Bog, Fen, Marsh, Swamp, and Shallow Water) that represent the types of wetlands encountered in Canada. An additional category, “partially classified” was used to preserve boundary information for wetlands that could not be classified into the main categories with existing information.

  • Categories  

    This collection of data summarizes the companies and facilities reporting under the Fuels Information Regulations, No. 1. This dataset includes total fuel volumes, sulphur contents and masses, and companies reporting production and/or importation of liquid fuels originating from crude oils, coal or bituminous sand. The information was provided to Environment and Climate Change Canada under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

  • Categories  

    This collection of data summarizes the companies reporting under the Renewable Fuels Regulations. This data set includes total liquid petroleum fuel volumes, renewable fuel volumes, and compliance unit creation. This data set also includes information on compliance by company. The information was provided to Environment and Climate Change Canada under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

  • Categories  

    Canada has the longest coastline in the world, measuring 243,790 kilometers. Many of our waterways along the coastline have to be dredged regularly to keep shipping channels and harbours open and safe for navigation; and this material is sometimes best disposed of at sea. Schedule 5 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA) defines an exclusive list of materials and substances suitable for disposal at sea in Canada, which is in accordance with the London Protocol (1996). They are: dredged material, fish waste resulting from industrial fish processing operations, ships or platforms, inert and inorganic geological matter, uncontaminated organic matter of natural origin, and bulky substances. The disposal of any substance into the sea, on the seabed, in the subsoil of the seabed, or onto ice, from a ship, an aircraft, a platform or other structure is not allowed unless a permit is issued by the Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) Disposal at Sea Program. Incineration at sea, as well as importing or exporting a substance for disposal at sea is also prohibited. More information on Disposal at Sea is available at: https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/disposal-at-sea.html The Active and Inactive Disposal at Sea Sites in Canadian Waters dataset provides spatial and related information of at-sea disposal sites approved for use in Canada in the last ten years and that remain open for consideration for additional use. Any additional use of a disposal site must be conducted in accordance with the terms and conditions of a valid Disposal at Sea permit. The dataset may be of use in relation to Disposal at Sea permit applications. For some Disposal at Sea permit applications the data may be of use in assessing serious harm to fish under the Fisheries Act and assessing interference with navigation under the Navigation Protection Act.

  • Categories  

    Sidney Island Shorebird Surveys transects area feature.

  • Categories  

    Environment and Climate Change Canada’s cause-effect monitoring is focused on understanding how boreal songbirds, including several Species at Risk, are affected by human activity in the oil sands area, particularly the impact of the physical disturbance of forested habitats from exploration, development and construction of oil sands. Determining the abundance of songbird species associated with various habitat type(s) and understanding how the type and number of birds varies with type and amount of habitat, are important components of assessing the effect of habitat disturbance. Regional-scale monitoring focuses on understanding how and why boreal songbirds, including several Species at Risk, are affected by human activity across the Peace, Athabasca and Cold Lake oil sands area. Local-scale projects focus on addressing gaps in our understanding of complex response patterns at regional scales by targeting specific habitats or development features of interest. These data contribute to: a. improving the design of monitoring programs; b. explaining observed trends in populations (why bird populations are increasing or decreasing); c. predicting population sizes within the oil sands area; and d. assessing the individual, additive and cumulative effects of oil sands and other resource development on boreal birds. Data are used by ECCC and our partners to develop new models and increase the robustness of existing models of bird responses to habitat and disturbance. Because models can be used to predict outcomes of future land management scenarios, these models can assist decision-making by helping evaluate land-use choices before impacts are directly observed.

  • Categories  

    Surveyor shorebird bird observations and counts for all years.

  • Categories  

    Survey points is a point feature class containing transects and observations completed in 2011.

  • Categories  

    The Atlas of Pelagic Seabirds off the West Coast of Canada presents maps that display the distribution of 48 species of seabirds and two species pairs (i.e., Red-necked and Red Phalaropes, and Hawaiian and Galapagos Petrels). Seabird surveys were conducted aboard commercial and Canadian federal government ‘ships-of-opportunity’ from 1982-1983 and 1991-2005 within the study area (45° N to 58° N and from the coast to 148° W). Sightings of rare species that came from other sources (including some pre 1982 and post 2005) are also included in order to present as complete a picture as possible. For 33 species and one species pair, the average densities within 5’ latitude by 5’ longitude grid cells are displayed seasonally. The seabirds mapped in this manner include 11 species of Procellariiformes (albatrosses, fulmars, petrels, shearwaters and storm-petrels), and 24 species of Charadriiformes (phalaropes, skuas, gulls, terns and auks). The sighting locations for an additional 15 species and one species pair are also mapped. This group, comprised of 10 species of Procellariiformes and seven species of Charadriiformes includes species that are relatively uncommon to rare in the study area (but previously documented); and species that are extremely rare and/or have not been documented and thus remain unconfirmed. These data may be used to generate presence/absence and trends in and estimates of relative abundance. These data can also be used to examine patterns in temporal and spatial distribution. However, due to the opportunistic nature of the surveys, both in space and time, these data should not be used to determine absolute abundance. The rationale for developing this atlas was the recognized need for a product that could assist with: coastal zone and conservation area planning; emergency response to environmental emergencies; and identification of areas of potential interactions between seabirds and anthropogenic activities. In addition, the data used to develop the document provides a baseline to compare with future seabird distributions in order to measure the impacts of shifts in composition, abundance and/or distribution of prey, and climatic and oceanographic changes.

  • Categories  

    Sidney Island Shorebirds Survey transects line feature.